Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Regarding the decision not to activate storm sirens last night...

Mid America Live spoke with Adrian Fire Chief Gary Dizney regarding the decision not to activate storm sirens in Adrian last night and found the reason to be that the possible tornado was in fact 7 miles outside of town, moving away from the area.

The timeline:
11:37 P.M. Adrian Fire and Emergency Management Departments were dispatched and made aware of a severe thunderstorm warning
11:42 P.M. Bates County Dispatch advised of an updated duration time for the severe thunderstorm warning
11:44 P.M. Adrian Fire and Emergency Management Departments were dispatched for a tornado warning for the northwestern part of Bates County. The storm was reported by the National Weather Service and the storm cell that prompted the tornado warning was reported to be located seven miles south of Adrian and was moving east at 45 MPH. The possibility of rotation in this cell was radar indicated and prompted the warning.

A recap from Chief Dizney:
The Adrian Fire and Emergency Management Departments along with multiple other agencies, including the Bates County Sheriff’s Department, Butler Fire Department, trained firefighter storm spotters who were in the field monitoring the storm, and multiple firefighters who were in station keeping a watchful eye on radar- all of which were taking measures to ensure public safety as this was a fast moving, fast developing storm. There were just two minutes between the warning of a severe thunderstorm which was upgraded to a tornado warning, so we acted upon the information we were given and took the appropriate actions based on the information we had.
The tornado warning sirens were not activated for the City of Adrian because the radar indicated storm cell that prompted the tornado warning was reported to be seven miles south of Adrian and moving “east” at 45 MPH. The warning indicated possible rotation aloft but there were no reports of any actual tornado sightings.


Editor's note: As Spring storm season is upon us, the public can rest assured that our local fire departments and first responders make themselves readily available and keep 'an eye to the sky' as they are trained in keeping public safety at the forefront in every case.

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